KNOW courses are offered by the faculty of the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge at both the graduate and the advanced undergraduate levels. For graduate students, we offer a number of cross-listed seminars as well as an annual core sequence in topics in the formation of knowledge (KNOW 401, 402, 403). These seminars will be team-taught by faculty from different departments or schools and are open to all graduate students regardless of field of study. Graduate students who enroll in two quarters of this sequence are eligible to apply for the SIFK Dissertation Research Fellowships.

KNOW 23003: Politics and the Sacred: Divinities and Essences in the Making of Political Order

  • Course Level: Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Spring
  • Fridays 3:00 - 5:50 PM
  • Andreas Glaeser

Politics is replete with references to phenomena that are themselves imagined to lie beyond political inference. Four such phenomena that are imagined as absolutes stand out in the making of the Europeanoid world: 1. the idea of a single all-knowing, all-powerful creator god; 2. the idea that the world as it appears to us is grounded in unchanging essences; 3.  the idea that there can be a sovereign power that has the final and undisputable say in all matters political; and 4. the idea that like the material world human affairs are governed by unchanging laws which can be systematically exploited for creating a better social order. This course looks at the historical context in which these ideas have both emerged (or re-emerged) and found lastingly impactful formulations in the Hebrew Bible, Plato’s Philosophy, the works of Bodin and Hobbes, as well as in the works of Comte and Marx. It also explores the reasons and theorizes why references to absolutes appear to be so appealing to politicians.

KNOW 31407: Hermeneutic Sociology

  • Course Level: Graduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Spring
  • M 5:00 - 7:50
  • Andreas Glaeser

The core ideas of a social hermeneutics expanding traditional textual hermeneutics into social life, were developed in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. They can be summarized in a few intertwining propositions: First, discursive, emotive and sensory modalities of sense making, conscious and unconscious, characterize and differentiate social life forms. Second, sense making is acting, thus entangled in institutions. Third, sense making proceeds in diverse media whose structures and habits of use shape its process rendering form and style important. Fourth, sense making is structured by the relationships within which they take place. Fifth, sense making is crucial for the reproduction of all aspects of life forms. Sixths, sense making, life forms, and media are dialectically (co-constitutively) intertwined with each other. Seventh, social hermeneutics is itself sense-making. The course will explore these ideas by reading classical statements that highlight the core analytical concepts that social hermeneuticists employ such as symbolization, interpretation, mediation, rhetoric, performance, performativity, interpretive community, institutionalization. Every session will combine a discussion of the readings with an analytical practicum using these concepts. Authors typically include Vico, Herder, Dilthey, Aristotle, Burke, Austin, Ricoeur, Schütz, Bourdieu, Peirce, Panofsky, Ranciere, Lakoff, Mackenzie, Latour.

KNOW 23002: How to Build a Global Empire

  • Course Level: Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Spring
  • TBD
  • Stuart M. McManus

Empire is arguably the oldest, most durable and most diffused form of governance in human history that reached its zenith with the global empires of Spain, Portugal and Britain.  But how do you build a global empire?  What political, social, economic and cultural factors contribute to their formation and longevity?  What effects do they have on the colonizer and the colonized?  What is the difference between a state, an empire and a “global” empire?  We will consider these questions and more in case studies that will treat the global empires of Rome, Portugal and Britain, concluding with a discussion of the modern resonances of this first “Age of Empires.”

KNOW 40303: The Humanities as a Way of Knowing

  • Course Level: Graduate, Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2016-17
  • Term: Spring
  • Mondays 9:30 - 12:20 PM
  • SCTH 30925,HIST 29517,HIST 39517,PHIL 20925,PHIL 30925,CLAS 37316,CHSS 30925
  • Lorraine Daston

Despite intertwined histories and many shared practices, the contemporary humanities and sciences stand in relationships of contrast and opposition to one another. The perceived fissure between the "Two Cultures" has been deepened by the fact that the bulk of all history and philosophy of science has been devoted to the natural sciences. This seminar addresses the history and epistemology of what in the nineteenth century came to be called the "sciences" and the "humanities" since the Renaissance from an integrated perspective. The historical sources will focus on shared practices in, among others, philology, natural history, astronomy, and history. The philosophical source will develop an epistemology of the humanities: how humanists know what they know.

Note: This course fulfills one of two courses of the KNOW Core Seminar requirement to be eligible to apply for the SIFK Dissertation Research Fellowship.

KNOW 40302: Islam and Modern Science

  • Course Level: Graduate
  • Department: Parent
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Spring
  • R 10:30 - 1:20 PM
  • KNOW 40302, AASR 40302, ISLM 40302, ANTH XXXXX
  • Alireza Doostdar

Since the nineteenth century, the rise of the modern empirical sciences has provided both challenges and opportunities for Muslim-majority societies. In this seminar, we examine the epistemological, institutional, and biopolitical transformations that have come about in these societies through encounters with a range of natural and social scientific disciplines (astronomy, medicine, psychology, psychical research, psychoanalysis, eugenics, economics, sociology, anthropology, and others). Readings are from anthropology, history, and science studies.

This course fulfills the KNOW Core Seminar requirement to be eligible to apply for the SIFK Dissertation Research Fellowship.

KNOW 21406 / 31406: History of Skepticism

  • Course Level: Graduate, Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Spring
  • KNOW 21406, KNOW 31406, HIST 29516, HIST 39516
  • Ada Palmer

Before we ask what is true or false, we must ask how we can know what is true or false. This course examines the vital role doubt and philosophical skepticism have played in the Western intellectual tradition, from pre-Socratic Greece through the Enlightenment, with a focus on how Criteria of Truth—what kinds of arguments are considered legitimate sources of certainty—have changed over time. The course will examine dialog between skeptical and dogmatic thinkers, and how many of the most fertile systems in the history of philosophy have been hybrid systems which divided the world into things which can be known, and things which cannot. The course will touch on the history of atheism, heresy and free thought, on fideism and skeptical religion, and will examine how the Scientific Method is itself a form of philosophical skepticism. Primary source readings will include Plato, Sextus Empiricus, Lucretius, Ockham, Pierre Bayle, Montaigne, Descartes, Francis Bacon, Hobbes, Voltaire, Diderot, and others.

KNOW 21405 / 31405: The Italian Renaissance

  • Course Level: Graduate, Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Spring
  • KNOW 21405, KNOW 31405, HIST 22900, HIST 32900
  • Ada Palmer

Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250–1600), with a focus on literature and primary sources, the recovery of lost texts and technologies of the ancient world, and the role of the Church in Renaissance culture and politics. Humanism, patronage, translation, cultural immersion, dynastic and papal politics, corruption, assassination, art, music, magic, censorship, religion, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Assignments include creative writing, reproducing historical artifacts, and a live reenactment of a papal election. First-year students and non-history majors welcome.

KNOW 21404 / 31404: History of Perception

  • Course Level: Graduate, Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Winter
  • KNOW 21404, KNOW 31404, HIST 25309, HIST 35309
  • Michael Rossi

Knowing time. Feeling space. Smelling. Seeing. Touching. Tasting. Hearing. Are these universal aspects of human consciousness, or particular experiences contingent upon time, place, and culture? How do we come to know about our own perceptions and those of others? This course examines these and related questions through detailed readings of primary sources, engagement in secondary scholarship in the history and anthropology of sensation, and through close work with participants’ own sensations and perceptions of the world around them.

KNOW 21403 / 31403: Censorship from the Inquisition to the Present

  • Course Level: Graduate, Undergraduate
  • Department: Crosslist
  • Year: 2017-18
  • Term: Autumn
  • KNOW 21403, KNOW 31403, HIST 25421, HIST 35421
  • Ada Palmer; Stuart M. McManus

Collaborative research seminar on the history of censorship and information control, with a focus on the history of books and information technologies. The class will meet in Special Collections, and students will work with the professor to prepare an exhibit, The History of Censorship, to be held in the Special Collections exhibit space in spring. Students will work with rare books and archival materials, design exhibit cases, write exhibit labels, and contribute to the exhibit catalog. Half the course will focus on censorship in early modern Europe, including the Inquisition, the spread of the printing press, and clandestine literature in the Renaissance and Enlightenment. Special focus on the effects of censorship on classical literature, both newly rediscovered works like Lucretius and lost books of Plato, and authors like Pliny the Elder and Seneca who had been available in the Middle Ages but became newly controversial in the Renaissance. The other half of the course will look at modern and contemporary censorship issues, from wartime censorship, to the censorship comic books, to digital rights management, to free speech on our own campus. Students may choose whether to focus their own research and exhibit cases on classical, early modern, modern, or contemporary censorship.

KNOW 40300: Case Studies on the Formation of Knowledge 2

  • Course Level: Graduate
  • Department: Parent
  • Year: 2015-16
  • Term: Spring
  • TR 1:30 - 2:50 PM
  • CHSS 40300, CMLT 41803, EALC 50300, HIST 40201, SOCI 40210
  • Robert J. Richards, John Goldsmith, Michael Rossi, Haun Saussy, Andreas Glaeser

The KNOW core seminars for graduate students are offered by the faculty of the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge. This two-quarter sequence provides a general introduction, followed by specific case studies, to the study of the formation of knowledge. Each course will explore 2-3 case study topics, and each case study will be team-taught within a “module.” A short research paper is required at the end of each quarter. Graduate students from every field are welcome. Those who take both quarters are eligible to apply for a SIFK Dissertation Research Fellowship.
 

Module 1 : Approaches to Science
Robert Richards, John Goldsmith

This module will examine the ways several established disciplines, particularly linguistics and biology, came together in the mid-19th century to establish the science of psychology.  Both linguistics and biology offered empirical and theoretical avenues into the study of mind.  Researchers in each advanced their considerations either in complementary or oppositional fashion.

Module 2 : Origins of the Social Construction of Knowledge
Robert Richards, Michael Rossi

This module will trace the development of the idea of the social construction of knowledge and its relation to philosophy and history of science.  The development lit a spark, then created a conflagration, and yet still smolders.

Module 3 : The Politics of Philosophical Knowledge
Haun Saussy, Andreas Glaeser

The Politics/Philosophy module has to do with the emergence of theories of "schools of thought" in the context of political change. The two examples to be examined are Plato's criticism of the Sophists and Sima Qian's account of the Warring States intellectual landscape, terminated by the consolidation of the Empire.